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China summons Canada envoy over detained Huawei exec: state media

China summons Canada envoy over detained Huawei exec: state media

During her bail hearing on Friday, a prosecutor for the Canadian government said USA charges against her have to do with Huawei using an unofficial subsidiary to access the Iran market in dealings that would contravene US sanctions.

Major companies have expressed concerns about how the arrest of Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou in Canada at the request of us authorities would affect U.S.

Crown counsel told a court in Vancouver the U.S.is seeking Meng's extradition for offenses linked to violations of a company called Skycom.

China is demanding Canada release Huawei's chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who was arrested a week ago in Vancouver after a request from US authorities.

No decision was reached at the extradition hearing after almost six hours of arguments and counter-arguments, and the hearing was adjourned until Monday.

Gibb-Carsley told the B.C. Supreme Court hearing that Reuters reported in 2013 that Huawei was operating Skycom and had attempted to import USA -manufactured computer equipment into Iran in violation of sanctions. SkyCom's alleged sanctions breaches occurred from 2009 to 2014, while Meng's alleged fraudulent misrepresentations were in 2013.

The prosecutor opposed bail, arguing that Meng was a high flight risk with few ties to Vancouver and that her family's wealth would mean than even a multi-million-dollar surety would not weigh heavily should she breach conditions.

A major pillar of the US case is a misrepresentation that Meng allegedly made to a USA bank in 2013, referred to as "Financial Institution 1".

China vows quick action on U.S. trade promises: 'The sooner the better'
His remarks renewed fears that the Fed may miscalculate and raise rates so high or so fast as to depress growth. The White House has now backpedaled, acknowledging there was no deal in place to roll back automotive tariffs.

Dow futures slide after the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Canada; Doug McKelway reports from the White House.

Meng's defense lawyer David Martin said the evidence presented doesn't prove she broke either USA or Canadian law.

Yesterday's court hearing is meant to decide on whether Meng can post bail or if she is a flight risk and should be kept in detention. Fleeing "would humiliate and embarrass her father, whom she loves", he argued.

A senior executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei is facing allegations of fraud by using a subsidiary to violate United States and European Union trade sanctions against Iran in a case that shook world stock markets this week. Until then, she will remain in custody.

Canada's arrest of Meng at the request of the United States, while she was changing plane in Vancouver, was a serious breach of her rights, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng said. Huawei reportedly also received several warnings over violating Iranian sanctions. At the time, Meng served as the management firm's company secretary.

The probe of Huawei is similar to one that threatened the survival of China's ZTE Corp, which pleaded guilty in 2017 to violating USA laws that restrict the sale of American-made technology to Iran.

Huawei said Friday that it would "continue to follow the bail hearing", expressing "every confidence that the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will reach the right conclusion".

The ban comes after a United States request to allies to avoid products made by the two companies over fears they contain viruses used for cyberattacks, the Yomiuri said, citing unnamed government sources. Even though the North American neighbors have a longstanding treaty governing extradition, it can take months, even years, for a defendant to be handed over, if at all.

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